A Request For Your Haiku

 

2006Cofrancesco_Toland

That’s right!  It’s time once again to consider submitting one or two of your best haiku to our 18th Annual Poster Series!  If you have ever contributed haiku to the Syracuse Poster Project, you may have already seen our Invitation Brochure in the mail this past week!

If you’re new to the Project, and would like to participate, please click HERE for our standard entry form.  To download our specially designed Invitation Brochure, click HERE.  Or, feel free to contact us to be put on the mailing list for next August’s announcement! 

From our 2006 Series:
haiku by Joan Cofrancesco with
illustration by artist, Toni Toland.

Their spirits are there / Native voices echoing / Onondaga Lake

Something New for Our 2019 Series: Since our beginnings, our haiku posters have been culled from illustrations created by Syracuse University students.  The last 3-4 years, we introduced specially themed Series posters, commissioned by local artists, and invited poets to write a haiku about the poster.

2004_MacPherson_Daly

This year’s call for haiku is especially noteworthy as we are reinvigorating our work by reaching out to artists from across the community and throughout the Central New York area who will illustrate our 18th Series’ posters based on the haiku of their choice.  Aside from submitting your best haiku for community-based illustrators to choose from, please share this exciting news with your artist friends or consider referring us to artists you may know of!

 

From our 2004 Series:
haiku by Dick MacPherson and
illustrated by Jon Daly.

Syracuse Football / domed from the cold, wind & rain / Orange Victory

As always, we welcome your poetic contributions that reflect our fair city’s multicultural heart, the Central New York countryside or Syracuse at large!  In fact, many haiku previously selected for illustration have celebrated our area’s four distinct seasons, our favorite Syracuse pastimes, our community celebrations and events.

Beyond haiku posters, your work stands a chance of being shared with the public in other ways, as well: via specially printed cards, haiku booklets, haiku-of-the day features, on our Blog and new this year, on large-format flat screens traveling with our poster exhibit.  And, if your haiku is chosen to be illustrated for the next Series, it will be on display for one year following our unveiling event in April, 2019!

2009Cassady_DinardoMounted in downtown’s colorfully painted kiosks along Salina and Warren Streets, each of our illustrated haiku posters uniquely enhances downtown Syracuse!  Like our mission, our haiku posters continue to bridge art and poetry within our community and with our Central New York neighbors

 

 

 

From our 2009 Series:
haiku by Jane Cassady and
illustrator, Sarah Anne DiNardo.

At Alto Cinco / do as the bartender says: / Pinot Grigio

A special note for elementary and secondary school teachers: If you are an elementary and / or secondary school teacher, we would love to hear from you and your students, too!  2018Syracuse_Poster_Project_Art_19Several of our haiku posters feature student poems–we greatly enjoy the vision and spirit of their work.  If you decide to have your class participate, please help with the selection by sending us the best five haiku from each class.

 

 

 

Enjoying our 2018 Series
Unveiling Event: Theresa Marsh and poet,
Sara Marsh.

      Soulful minds converge, / jazz, punk, reggae, hip hop, funk. / Westcott’s rich flavor      

We will be collecting your haiku now through September 7, 2018–this year’s deadline for submitting haiku.  Please do accept our invitation and consider submitting a haiku or two… or three!

Thank You and Happy Writing!

 

 

 

 

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Haiku to Warm Up January

Snow and slush and sleet
and rain and hail–and sun!–and
clouds and ice and salt.

Typical of January, it’s been cold and snowy–and everything else inbetween–as mischievously described in Matt Tompkins’ (Owego 2013) haiku above. Dark frigid nights seem to last forever this time of year, too, though daylight is (thankfully) lasting longer. Haiku has the perfect ability to express these Winter days in such a way that you can nearly forget it’s January…well, almost! Try warming up with these few other haiku found in our archives and written by our wonderful contributors.

When it’s not too cold or blustery, January offers a great time to be outdoors. In this colorful haiku, poet Lee Savidge (Liverpool 2013) sets a sensory mood for a day skiing. Can you feel the anticipation?…the thrill of a good day on the slopes?…not noticing the cold on your face?

Perfect packed powder,
exhilarating ski trails–
lean forward and smile!

In just a few words, Kate Stewart’s (Cazenovia 2012) haiku beautifully describes a different kind of sensory experience only known during the long Winter months:

Snow diamonds twinkle.
Crisp night air, I hear only
Softly, gliding skis.

Like skiing, if you have ever snowshoed, you know you’ve left an indelible path on your journey. If it should snow overnight, you might have trouble finding that path again in the morning. But on a clear, moonlit night, you might not have any problem at all–as cleverly described in Joan Cofrancesco’s haiku (Camillus 2001):

moon looms over pines
along the Beaver Lake trail
snowshoes left behind

Reminiscent of the first ‘no school day’ of January, our featured haiku poster is from our 2014 Series. The haiku, with the wonderful play on words, was written by Dianne Emmick and richly illustrated by former Syracuse University student, Ash Merkel, now a working artist whose fine illustrations, sketches and ceramic work can be found here.

Cars trapped in driveways. / Skiers glide softly mid—street / Making morning tracks.

2014Emmick_Merkel

Speaking of ‘snow days’ have you noticed the neighborhood kids with their sleds? Do you remember, as a kid yourself, climbing that big hill in your own backyard, dragging up your new red Flying Saucer, holding on tight and getting that head-start of a push from behind? If you do, you’ll enjoy this haiku by Elisabeth Anderson, (Lafayette 2001):

We haul our sleds up,
and push off.  Trees blur, snow leaps
aside. We can fly!

All in all, when you have a haiku warming your insides, January isn’t too bad! Do you have a Winter haiku to share? Send it in the comments below and we will post it in our next Blog!  As Thomas Stock (Fort Plain 2014) cheerily writes, Winter can be a sensory feast:

I am your haiku
in red ski vest gliding through
your white city park

Stay Warm!

Rosalyn M. Carroll for the Syracuse Poster Project

A Haiku Nod to Sunflowers

As the end of Summer draws near, sturdy Sunflowers still stand shoulder high.  While their full-seeded heads seem to be nodding, Farewell, their brilliant shades of yellow add a unique dimension to the colorful arrival of Autumn.  

From our archives, we found some Sunflower-themed haiku to share with you–what better way to show our appreciation for this beautiful flower that bridges Summer into Autumn!

Brilliant sunflowers                                                                                                                                       cast against slate sky, red birds                                                                                                                       fly in for dinner                                                                                                                                                                          by Sheila Forsyth (Fayetteville 2008)

 Lofty sunflowers                                                                                                                                             arrayed in golden splendor                                                                                                                           heads above the rest                                                                                                                                                            by Sharon Rorer (Syracuse 2007)

Van Gogh Sunflowers                                                                                                                                      paint themselves across the fields                                                                                                                  Camillus, New York                                                                                                                                                           by Joan Cofrancesco (Camillus 2009)

From our 2010 Syracuse Poster Project Series, our featured haiku poster was written by Claire Bobrycki and illustrated by former Syracuse University student, Catherine LaPointe, now a children’s book illustrator and graphic designer–see more of her wonderful work here.

Blue Moon, Big Dipper / Sunflowers under porch lights / Peace on the South Side

2010Bobrycki_LaPointe

We conclude with three more gems:

Sunflowers drooping                                                                                                                                      looking for a warm embrace                                                                                                                        oh, where is the sun?                                                                                                                                                                   by Kelly Bargabos (Syracuse 2010)

Sunflower faces                                                                                                                                               a swoosh of yellow and black:                                                                                                                        goldfinch dinnertime                                                                                                                                                               by Ellen Barnes (Syracuse 2014)

A smile on your face                                                                                                                                         is brighter than sunflowers                                                                                                                         at the farmer’s stand                                                                                                                                                                  by Jungtae Lee (Syracuse 2006)

We hope you’ve enjoyed our brief tribute to the Sunflower! What do you see when you gaze upon a Sunflower?