Haiku Call – 2020 Series

The deadline to submit up to three (3) of your best haiku to the 2020 Syracuse Poster Project Series is quickly approaching! Is yours ready?

The 2020 Poster Series will consist of the traditional 15 posters based on life in and around Syracuse, and one specially themed poster on the pleasures of living healthy in Central New York. Again this year, haiku selected to become a poster will be illustrated by local artists. Completed works will hang in the colorful kiosks lining downtown Syracuse beginning next Spring!

Are you needing some inspiration? Not sure how to capture a moment? Consider how simple sensory experiences influenced the writing of these frequent SPP contributors:

Walk…along an Erie Canal pathway as Rosalyn M. Carroll (Manlius 2007) often does:

Wildflowers sway bright
Dragonflies buzz and fish bite
Erie traffic hums

Watch…the flight of a butterfly as Jungtae Lee (Syracuse 2008) did:

a monarch flutters
in and around the buildings
a flower pot calls

Look…quietly and be surprised as Anton Ninno (Syracuse 2014) was:

Pond at Barry Park
tall reeds in quiet water
Heron strikes–and eats!

Listen…closely to the night as Paul Goat Allen (Camillus 2004) did:

Sidewalks spill laughter
Armory Square fellowship
downtown Summer night

Feel…the thrill and rush of air as Craig Overbeck (Fayetteville 2016) does:

Nothing is better
than flying downhill fast–on
a red bicycle

For more inspiration, we think you’ll agree that our featured haiku poster beautifully reflects life, love, tradition and memorable experiences all wrapped into one. The haiku was written by Dianne Apter and illustrated by Kathleen O’Dell for our 2019 Poster Series.

Syracuse front porch / Ladies young—older—oldest / Wine—laughter—gossip

As you prepare to write, remember, nearly all haiku selected for illustration by the Syracuse Poster Project celebrate our area’s four distinct seasons, our favorite pastimes, our many diverse community celebrations and events!

For the special poster on the pleasures of living healthy in CNY, think broadly of physical, emotional and spiritual health, and reflect on lifestyle choices that leave you feeling healthy!

Create your haiku with three lines of 5, 7, 5 syllables. Comb through your personal experiences and use your imagination! If you need more inspiration, you’ll find more good haiku here on our Poetry Blog or browse through our Gallery and our Shop.

If you’re new to the Project or you need additional entry information, please click HERE for our standard entry form. To download our specially designed 2020 Series Invitation Brochure, click HERE.

Give it a try – what have you got to lose?!

Be sure to submit your poems by Friday, September 6, 2019.

Got Haiku?

A call for haiku is now underway for the Syracuse Poster Project’s 17th annual series of haiku posters! In fact, you’re invited! Please consider participating in this community-wide event by submitting up to three (3) of your best haiku which reflect our fair city’s multi-cultural heart, the Central New York countryside or Syracuse at large!  

Nicora_Gangi_Poster 2018

In addition, we have commissioned Syracuse artist, Nicora Gangi, to create a poster giving you the unique opportunity–in essence, an Ekphrastic challenge–to write at least one (1) haiku inspired by her wonderful image!  That image being, fittingly enough, of our city as a place of welcome to all people and cultures.  Ms. Gangi will select the winning haiku.  To read a review of her superb work, click here.

Each haiku you submit before Friday, September 8 will be presented to a senior class of Syracuse University illustration students.  Ultimately, your haiku may be chosen to be illustrated by one of these students!  Of all the posters created, 15 of the best haiku posters will be selected for display in downtown Syracuse kiosks next April, 2018.

Need inspiration?  Not sure how to capture a moment?  Consider how these frequent contributors approach writing haiku–

Walk…along an Erie Canal pathway, where, as Rosalyn Carroll (Manlius 2007), writes:

Wildflowers sway bright / Dragonflies buzz and fish bite / Erie traffic hums

Watch…as Debra Alexis (Jamesville 2016) does:

Moonbeams hitch a ride / onto lazy waves, while the / leaves flutter and fall

Look…as Anton Ninno (Syracuse 2014) does:

Pond at Barry Park / tall reeds in quiet water / heron strikes–and eats!

Listen…as Paul Goat Allen (Camillus 2004) does:

Sidewalks spill laughter / Armory Square fellowship / downtown Summer night

Feel…as Barbara McCleary (Fulton 2009) does:

Walking by the lake / Icy winds that sear my soul. / My cheeks are burning!

Remember, any season, any place, any subject–write about your experiences in a haiku using three lines of 5, 7, 5 syllables, and submit your poems by September 8, 2017.  For further details, click here for this year’s brochure.  For additional entry materials, click here.  If you’re new to writing haiku, click here for general guidelines.  Find more good haiku by local poets in this poetry blog.  

Get Writing!

 

Haiku for a Slow Start to Spring

Pink clouds dot the sky                                                                                                                                                                            Black crows fly past crescent moon                                                                                                                                                       A change of weather

                                                                                     by Peter Allen (Syracuse 2013)


Whether or not you care much about the weather, it is one of the major topics of conversation anywhere, anytime, anyhow, no matter the day or the time of year.  It pretty much affects everything around us and everything we do.  We, at Syracuse Poster Project, would rightfully guess that we receive more haiku written about weather–like the fine poem above–than about any other subject!

Changes in the weather often signal a change in the season, too.  For instance, in Central New York today, while the calendar may say Spring, the weather these past few weeks has been mostly cold, dismally grey and, well…cold.  In fact, on St. Patrick’s Day–usually a fine day to celebrate the imminent arrival of Spring–there were snowbanks here that were as high as an elephant’s eye! The tulips and daffodils that had started to peek out from the cold March ground were quickly sent packing.  

Moving from March to April isn’t always easy or fast.  Thank goodness for Haiku to put this change of season into perspective!  Take, for example, this poignantly expressive haiku from frequent Syracuse Poster Project contributor, Jay Cox (Pompey, 2001):

Treetops’ sprawling arms                                                                                                                                                                        tremble, holding pale gray sky–                                                                                                                                                           snow patches linger.

Or, consider the perspective found in this uplifting haiku from Anton Ninno (Syracuse, 2008):

Last snow of the year                                                                                                                                                                                crashes down, heavy and wet                                                                                                                                                                 young buds shake it off

From Craig Overbeck, (Fayetteville, 2015), a stirring haiku with an artistic glimpse of what awaits us this Spring:

To the south, rain falls.                                                                                                                                                                  Gray brushstrokes sweep from dark clouds                                                                                                                                        To paint the hills green.

We think you’ll agree, this warm and delightful haiku by Rachel Guido deVries (Cazenovia, 2001) enriches any conversation about the weather or change of season.  Her words create a feeling beautifully captured in this poster from our 2015 Series by former Syracuse University Illustration student, Lise Sukhu.  To see more of Lise’s artwork, click here.

Dog sleeps safe from rain, / nestled in blankets, my feet / warm up, beneath her

2015Guido_de_Vries_Sukhu

Over the past several months we’ve highlighted many fine haiku written by our contributors about the weather and the change of seasons in Central New York.  Our accompanying featured posters beautifully underscore and accentuate the fine work we receive.  We hope you’ve enjoyed reading these poems as well as the few highlighted here today.  

And, remember, as we move from snow to rain this season, keep this cheerful haiku, written by Michelle Miles (Amman, Jordan 2016), in mind:

March into April,                                                                                                                                                                              Shed the outer cloak, breathe and                                                                                                                                                         Take the umbrella….

Until again, stay warm, stay dry! Happy Spring!