Haiku: Setting the Stage for Halloween

It’s the last week of October and Halloween is just about here! Costumes are at the ready and the candy bowl sits waiting for trick-or-treaters. But first, let’s set the scene. October days have grown shorter, with mornings chilly and foggy; its nights are crisp and long:

Trees stand silently
In morning’s Autumn darkness
Soon bright with sunlight

by Anonymous (2019)

Most trees stand bare now, too, with Autumn leaves piled high or blanketing the yard. Yet, here and there, the striking beauty of a Burning Bush or a tall Oak tree still garners a “wow”:

The mighty oak tree,
last to lose its leaves in Fall
see the red colors!

by Nanette Scogin (Watkins Glen 2019)

Now, listen to the cackle of crows as they roost in those bare treetops. What a mood they set:

“Ha!” Crow says, airing
wings atop the dead maple
creaking in the wind

by Jay Cox (Pompey 2007)

And, as dry leaves rustle and fly in the wind, look for ghosts roaming the
shadows of Syracuse:

Walking on Water
Ghosts of ancient barges pass
Soaked in history

by Evelyn Ayers-Marsh (Syracuse 2006)

Our featured haiku poster is from our 2018 Series and fits well with the revelry of Halloween! Poet, Mary Huling, and former Syracuse University Illustration Student, Elise Beauchamp – now a Los Angeles-based Illustrator – have created a perfectly spooky theme for Halloween using their love of Autumn’s colorful fire and light!

Season of color / Scraping out seeds within /Lighted orange smile

And, at last, as Pumpkins are carved and lit, the stage is set for a ghoulish Halloween night:

Jack O’Lanterns grin,
Skeletons jangle and roll
Halloween is here!

by Rosalyn M. Carroll (Manlius 2009)

Happy Haunting!

Haiku For The Start of Autumn

The Autumn Equinox arrived quietly last week, and as if on cue, end-of-September days have become cooler and starry nights, longer.  From the Syracuse Poster Project archives, our haiku contributors have found interesting ways to describe Summer’s prelude to Autumn.

Syracuse Poster Project contributor, Maggie Iribarne (DeWitt 2012) observes this seasonal passage of time with her evocative haiku:

Green gorge glimmering
Summer’s last cold splash summons
Fall’s red-gold promise

And, Sharon Rorer (Syracuse 2007) gently describes how the days following the Equinox tend to be around here:

Single Leaves flutter
on delicate air currents
still feels like Summer

Meanwhile, Deirdre Tait’s (Syracuse 2013) haiku vividly describes what many of us look forward to with the coming of Autumn: 

Rolling hills surround
orchards hold the gift of Fall
crisp, juicy goodness

Our featured haiku poster is from the 2019 Series.  Illustrated by CNY Artist, Steven Peters, the poster beautifully complements the colorful haiku written by frequent Syracuse Poster Project contributor, Sherry Chayat.

Hurled from their branches / Golden leaves swirl everywhere / Onondaga wind

Summer days are tough to leave behind, but as Mary Cappelli (Syracuse 2013) writes, there is beauty in the leaving:

a new slant of light
butterflies flit in gold leaves–
So long, sweet Summer!

Did you notice this year’s late arrival of the Autumn Equinox? Are you able to put your experience with a change of season into a haiku? Leave us your thoughts in the comments below–we’d love to hear from you!

Happy Autumn!

Haiku Call – 2020 Series

The deadline to submit up to three (3) of your best haiku to the 2020 Syracuse Poster Project Series is quickly approaching! Is yours ready?

The 2020 Poster Series will consist of the traditional 15 posters based on life in and around Syracuse, and one specially themed poster on the pleasures of living healthy in Central New York. Again this year, haiku selected to become a poster will be illustrated by local artists. Completed works will hang in the colorful kiosks lining downtown Syracuse beginning next Spring!

Are you needing some inspiration? Not sure how to capture a moment? Consider how simple sensory experiences influenced the writing of these frequent SPP contributors:

Walk…along an Erie Canal pathway as Rosalyn M. Carroll (Manlius 2007) often does:

Wildflowers sway bright
Dragonflies buzz and fish bite
Erie traffic hums

Watch…the flight of a butterfly as Jungtae Lee (Syracuse 2008) did:

a monarch flutters
in and around the buildings
a flower pot calls

Look…quietly and be surprised as Anton Ninno (Syracuse 2014) was:

Pond at Barry Park
tall reeds in quiet water
Heron strikes–and eats!

Listen…closely to the night as Paul Goat Allen (Camillus 2004) did:

Sidewalks spill laughter
Armory Square fellowship
downtown Summer night

Feel…the thrill and rush of air as Craig Overbeck (Fayetteville 2016) does:

Nothing is better
than flying downhill fast–on
a red bicycle

For more inspiration, we think you’ll agree that our featured haiku poster beautifully reflects life, love, tradition and memorable experiences all wrapped into one. The haiku was written by Dianne Apter and illustrated by Kathleen O’Dell for our 2019 Poster Series.

Syracuse front porch / Ladies young—older—oldest / Wine—laughter—gossip

As you prepare to write, remember, nearly all haiku selected for illustration by the Syracuse Poster Project celebrate our area’s four distinct seasons, our favorite pastimes, our many diverse community celebrations and events!

For the special poster on the pleasures of living healthy in CNY, think broadly of physical, emotional and spiritual health, and reflect on lifestyle choices that leave you feeling healthy!

Create your haiku with three lines of 5, 7, 5 syllables. Comb through your personal experiences and use your imagination! If you need more inspiration, you’ll find more good haiku here on our Poetry Blog or browse through our Gallery and our Shop.

If you’re new to the Project or you need additional entry information, please click HERE for our standard entry form. To download our specially designed 2020 Series Invitation Brochure, click HERE.

Give it a try – what have you got to lose?!

Be sure to submit your poems by Friday, September 6, 2019.

Haiku for a Rainy Spring

To the chagrin of many, rain has predominated the weather this Spring. In fact, it’s hard to believe it’s mid-June already, what with Summer officially beginning in a few days! One has to ask, where, oh where, is the sun?

To cheer you up, we’ve dug out some haiku dedicated to Rain…yes, Rain…

From Jeanne Viggiano (Syracuse, 2009) comes a haiku which perfectly describes a rainy workday and the promise of a dry, sunny evening!

Rain pelts the sidewalks.
Lunch hour is a duck and dash.
Forecast: sun by five.

You’ve heard that phrase, “We need the rain”? Well, one benefit of all the rain this Spring has been the lush greens and gorgeous colors of its slow-blooming flowers. Renee-Noelle Felice (Syracuse 2011) says it well in her haiku:

After weeks of rain,
hollyhocks–deep pink and red–
big as salad plates

Have you ever just sat and listened to the rain falling? Frequent haiku contributor, Anne Mackenzie (Skaneateles, 2014), hears something beautiful:

woodland canopy
raindrops tap-dancing on leaves
ageless lullaby

Listening to the rain takes another shape in this delightful haiku by poet, Nicholas Petrone (Syracuse, 2010):

wooden boards beneath
Ruskin front porch rocker creak
steady rain keeps time

Our featured haiku poster is from our 2004 Series. The bright haiku was written by long-time contributor, Marilyn Shelton; the illustration colorfully created by former Syracuse University
student, Marlene Heuer.

silver drops of rain / suddenly, a bright garden / of umbrellas blooms

Of course, when all else fails, there’s nothing like getting your Gene Kelly on, like Rosalyn Carroll (Manlius, 2016) does in her haiku:

With a steady beat,
rain strikes my umbrella—I’m
dancin’ in the rain

Stay dry! And, as the old song goes, “let a smile be your umbrella”!

Posted by Rosalyn M. Carroll for the Syracuse Poster Project


***************************** **Haiku For Memorial Day** *****************************

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Souls of the soldiers / march and quiet names surround / Freedom’s arena
by Mark Shevalier (Henderson 2007)

A well-written Haiku can say a lot in only a few words and 17 syllables–it can tell a story and even express deep emotions; it can also be political and make us pause to reflect upon the world around us. Like other forms of poetry, haiku can speak to war and peace, heroes and fallen soldiers, victory and defeat, freedom and sacrifice.

Heroes defended / Liberty and freedom rang / Stars and stripes rippled by Michelle Miles (Denver  2016)

Originally referred to in the late 1860’s as Decoration Day–a day of remembrance when mourners could grace the graves of the Civil War’s dead with flowers–Memorial Day became a national holiday in 1971.  It remains a day of solemn observance; a day reserved to honor and remember all Americans who have died while serving in our country’s military service.  

Run run Jerry run / freedom is at hand oh Lord / helpful hands stretch out by Pat Flowers (Columbus 2006)

Memorial Day is also a day to celebrate our many freedoms, the unique cause that these American servicemen and servicewomen died for.

Our featured haiku poster this Memorial Day is from our 2004 Series.  It was written by frequent contributor, Jay Cox and illustrated by former Syracuse University student, Steve Kim.  We think you’ll agree, the poster exemplifies the beauty of our monuments to remembrance, peace and freedom.

The blue sky ripples / and clouds stream by in the water / fountain reflections

As we remember those who fought for our freedom, we hope you’ve enjoyed these few haiku from our archives that best express our observation of Memorial Day!



					

Haiku For March Madness

Here at the Syracuse Poster Project, a lot of haiku submitted and contributed by our fine poets, highlight observations and sensory experiences found in the world around us. Topics run the gamut, from Mother Nature to our love of music, holiday celebrations and even sporting events!

To celebrate March Madness — the kind of madness when hoops, top seeds, Selection Sunday, brackets and hopeful Cinderella’s, take on a life of their own — we’ve opened up our archives to some fun haiku with an eye on Basketball!

Spoiler Alert: What with Syracuse University in our front yard, many of the haiku presented below highlight the Syracuse Orange games held at the Dome on the SU Hill.

In that airy Dome
orange knights vow grand conquest
Big East battleground!

by Robert Stone (Baldwinsville, 2008)

The stakes are rising,
screams echoing through the Dome,
the shot’s up, it’s in!

by Nolen Brann (Jamesville, 2018)

Hoops hysteria
basketball stars down the court
Orange Carrier

by Jennifer Fulco (Syracuse, 2012)

Our featured haiku poster is from our 2008 Series. The colorful haiku was written by poet, Pat Flowers and beautifully illustrated by former Syracuse University Illustration student, Gabe Eng-Goetz, now working as a professional artist and designer; he is also the founder of Runaway.

Fenced in glory hoops / leap in air toward heaven / endless chatter scores

From the 68 teams selected from across the country, to the Sweet Sixteen, to the Elite Eight, and down to the Final Four, March Madness is certainly an exciting tradition to welcome Spring!

The town with the MOST
We play basketball and boast
On streets we all coast

by Nick Ghezzi (Canastota, 2011)

Posted by Rosalyn M. Carroll for the Syracuse Poster Project

Haiku to Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day

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This year’s wintry mix of weather has not dampened the spirited shenanigans of St. Patrick’s Day revelers here in Central New York.  From parades and concerts to hearty helpings of corned beef and cabbage, St. Patrick’s Day is one of our favorite holidays! From our archives, please enjoy these cheerful haiku dedicated to this Irish celebration!

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Green attire swishes
Fast feet, giddy crowds sip ale
Leprechauns walk by

By Pearl Popiak (Syracuse 2011)

Parades, Irish music, food and drink, are among the ways we celebrate St. Patrick’s Day.

Salina Street wears
a green stripe and marching bands
on St. Patrick’s Day

By Nan Gartner (Fayetteville 2007)

It’s a day to revel in the sounds of bagpipes, bodhrans, Irish flutes and fiddles! And, it’s a great day for Irish dancing and singing of Danny Boy!

Dancers jig and clap
Bagpipes blast a cheering tune
Leprechauns skip by

By Gabrielle Gardner (Camillus 2013)

It’s a day that would be incomplete without corned beef and cabbage or a frothy Guinness Stout at your favorite Irish pub. Best of all, St Patrick’s Day is a sweet prelude to warmer weather!

on St. Patrick’s Day
the city dances with green,
welcoming Spring

By Heidi Stephens (North Syracuse 2008)

Our featured haiku poster on this special occasion is from our 2007 Series. The cheerful haiku was written by Jennifer Sanford and the poster beautifully illustrated by our own, Joseph Murphy, when he was an illustration student at Syracuse University. Joe is one of our Board Members; you can learn more about his work, here.

Our Irish landmark / Green light proudly wears the crown / Tipperary Hill

Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

Rosalyn M. Carroll for Syracuse Poster Project